Feelgood Health

Study TIPS for every age!

Help them achieve great results!
Have a look at our TOP TIPS FOR STUDYING below!
We have handy, practical and easy steps for each age group!

STUDY TIPS: AGE 7-10

  1. Provide guidance. Sit with your child and help him to break study material into manageable tasks.
  2. Mimmic. If a test is coming up, children of this age need to role play a test. Make up likely questions and have your child answer them. Remember that at this age, children learn mostly by repetition of the action so that they can remember having done it before - during study time at home.
  3. Stealth learning. Slip school work into everyday real-life situations. If your child is in the bath and is learning gravity in science - explain the water being pulled down the plug. Count tiles on the bathroom wall or shampoo bottles on the shelf to do math. Make sure to link these actions to the test, tell him "so when you get asked in your test what is 3 minus 1, it's like when we counted the 3 tooth brushes and took away the red one and were left with 2 brushes!" 
  4. Define a study area. As convenient as it may be, do not study at the kitchen table. This is too tempting for requests for drinks or snacks. A light meal should be given before study time, such as wholewheat crackers and low fat cheese and reduced sugar apple juice. During the study session, water and fruit can be provided. Choose a study area that you can both sit in together comfortably, with adequate light and room to spread out all required books and stationery. Have other children and pets occupied in another part of the house (if there is an older child, have him watch the rest of the family).
  5. Recap. Before the study session starts each day or evening, recap the previous day's work. Don't spend more than 5 to10 minutes (as you need to concentrate on the current day's work) but just mention it and do one or two sums before starting the new stuff.
  6. Hardest first. When it's time to do the current day's work, tackle the hardest stuff first. Children of this age tend to lose cloncentration very quickly as they have had a long day at school. It's best to jump in with the difficult work straight away and leave the easier stuff for later.
  7. Stay positive. You are the adult, so lead by example: stay positive and up-beat during the study session. Make it fun. Never criticise for wrong answers and they are no 'stupid questions'. Remember that learning takes place when there is no 'stress' in the brain, so keep calm and create a pleasant atmosphere for your child.
  8. Keep in touch. Speak to your child's teacher and let him/her know that you are providing study sessions. Ask if there are areas of your child's work that need special attention.
  9. Natural study aids: if you suspect your child has difficulty with concentration and staying focused, he may need Focus Formula, an all-natural tonic to assist learning endeavours. If there is also underlying agitation or behavioural issues, add BrightSpark for best results. More information can be found here.

STUDY TIPS AGE 11-15

  1. Remove distractions! This includes internet, phones, games, television, and any number of other distractions can be harmful to study! Get these items away from ANYONE who should be studying – until the study is over.
  2. Provide guidance. Sit with your child and help him to break study material into manageable tasks.
  3. Define a study area. As convenient as it may be, do not study at the kitchen table. This is too tempting for requests for drinks or snacks. A light meal should be given before study time, such as wholewheat crackers and low fat cheese and reduced sugar apple juice. During the study session, water and fruit can be provided. Choose a study area that you can both sit in together comfortably, with adequate light and room to spread out all required books and stationery. Have other children and pets occupied in another part of the house (if there is an older child, have him watch the rest of the family).
  4. Recap. Before the study session starts each day or evening, recap the previous day's work. Don't spend more than 5 to10 minutes (as you need to concentrate on the current day's work) but just mention it and do one or two sums before starting the new stuff.
  5. Hardest first. When it's time to do the current day's work, tackle the hardest stuff first. Children of this age tend to lose concentration very quickly as they have had a long day at school. It's best to jump in with the difficult work straight away and leave the easier stuff for later.
  6. Stay positive. You are the adult, so lead by example: stay positive and up-beat during the study session. Make it fun. Never criticise for wrong answers and they are no 'stupid questions'. Remember that learning takes place when there is no 'stress' in the brain, so keep calm and create a pleasant atmosphere for your child.
  7. Keep in touch. Speak to your child's teacher and let him/her know that you are providing study sessions. Ask if there are areas of your child's work that need special attention.
  8. Natural study aids: if you suspect your child has difficulty with concentration and staying focused, he may need Focus Formula, an all-natural tonic to assist learning endeavours. If there is also underlying agitation or behavioural issues, add BrightSpark for best results. More information can be found here.

STUDY TIPS AGE 16-20

  1. Remove distractions! This includes internet, phones, games, television, and any number of other distractions can be harmful to study! Get these items away from ANYONE who should be studying – until the study is over.
  2. Time it right. Schedule your study sessions before pleasant times of the day, like mealtimes or a favourite activity or television program. In this way you are rewarded after you finish, and you can enjoy your meal or show with the knowledge that you have worked hard!
  3. Brain food. Keeping your blood sugar balanced can help you stay alert and concentrate. Try not to snack on brain-drain foods, like junk food and chips, chocolate or sweets – these sugary snacks will temporarily make you feel more alert, but lead to a ‘slump’ shortly afterwards, even making you possibly want to sleep it off! Good snack foods are nuts, fruit, and cheese cubes!
  4. Contact past pupils/colleagues. Try and chat to those who have taken the same tests in previous years, many times they can offer invaluable advice as to how best to go about tackling the work.
  5. Think outside the box. Rent dvd's around the subject you are studying, visit museums and get a broad base of knowledge around that subject. If you are interested in what you are learning there is a better chance of retaining info.
  6. Be study wise. Focus on all headings and subheadings. They can help you organize your thoughts – and often give a logical structure to follow. Be sure you know all bold faced or italicized words. (Often, this is a clue that these terms are vital doorways to the information!) Review all summary sections and review questions. This can help to be sure you have successfully hit on all the points the textbook editors feel important. Review highlighted material. You obviously marked the book for a reason, try to figure out why. Be wary of using highlighted lines from second hand textbooks - you don't know for sure that the previous owner of the book got an "A" in the course! Check all your marginal notes. They may help you relate the text to your notes. It is always good to review your thoughts to recapture the moment. Review the key concepts out loud. Being your own lecturer can prove to your benefit, and you get to hear yourself talk! Some students find it extremely beneficial to record themselves reading summaries and notes out loud and then to listen to the notes at the same time as reading them – or just before going to bed. This helps to assimilate the knowledge visually (via the eyes) as well as on the auditory level (via the ears) – thus providing double benefit. 
  7. Natural study aids: if you suspect your teenager has difficulty with concentration and staying focused, she may need Study Plus, a herbal remedy to assist the brain in processing information and recalling studied material. Both remedies are side-effect free and contain NO stimulants, so safe to use. More information can be found here. For natural adult ADHD management, see Focus ADDult.

STUDY TIPS 21-35

  1. Remove distractions! This includes internet, phones, games, television, and any number of other distractions can be harmful to study! Make sure that you are not disturbed and that you have a quiet place to study.
  2. Time it right. Schedule your study sessions before pleasant times of the day, like mealtimes or a favourite activity or television program. In this way you are rewarded after you finish, and you can enjoy your meal or show with the knowledge that you have worked hard!
  3. Brain food. Keeping your blood sugar balanced can help you stay alert and concentrate. Try not to snack on brain-drain foods, like junk food and chips, chocolate or sweets – these sugary snacks will temporarily make you feel more alert, but lead to a ‘slump’ shortly afterwards, even making you possibly want to sleep it off! Good snack foods are nuts, fruit, and cheese cubes!
  4. Team study sessions. For varsity or college subjects, get like-minded people together to discuss papers, tests and exams. Pooling resources, swapping books and guides can really help - especially when topics call for comparison and analysis of subject matter.
  5. Contact past pupils/colleagues. Try and chat to those who have taken the same tests in previous years, many times they can offer invaluable advice as to how best to go about tackling the work.
  6. Think outside the box. Rent dvd's around the subject you are studying, visit museums and get a broad base of knowledge around that subject. If you are interested in what you are learning there is a better chance of retaining info.
  7. Be study wise. Focus on all headings and subheadings. They can help you organize your thoughts – and often give a logical structure to follow. Be sure you know all bold faced or italicized words. (Often, this is a clue that these terms are vital doorways to the information!) Review all summary sections and review questions. This can help to be sure you have successfully hit on all the points the textbook editors feel important. Review highlighted material. You obviously marked the book for a reason, try to figure out why. Be wary of using highlighted lines from second hand textbooks - you don't know for sure that the previous owner of the book got an "A" in the course! Check all your marginal notes. They may help you relate the text to your notes. It is always good to review your thoughts to recapture the moment. Review the key concepts out loud. Being your own lecturer can prove to your benefit, and you get to hear yourself talk! Some students find it extremely beneficial to record themselves reading summaries and notes out loud and then to listen to the notes at the same time as reading them – or just before going to bed. This helps to assimilate the knowledge visually (via the eyes) as well as on the auditory level (via the ears) – thus providing double benefit. 
  8. Natural study aids: if you have difficulty concentrating and remembering what you study, try Study Plus to assist the brain in processing information and recalling studied material. Both remedies are side-effect free and contain NO stimulants, so safe to use. More information can be found here. or natural adult ADHD management, see Focus ADDult.

STUDY TIPS 36+

  1. Remove distractions! This includes internet, phones, games, television, and any number of other distractions can be harmful to study! Make sure that you are not disturbed and that you have a quiet place to study.
  2. Time it right. Study during times of high energy. If you are a morning person, study early. This works well, as you can reward yourself with going out for a brisk walk and some fresh air afterwards. If you are an evening person, study in the evening. This works well, as you can prepare yourself by going out for a brisk walk and some fresh air beforehand.
  3. Team study sessions. For varsity or college subjects, or career tests get like-minded people together to discuss papers, tests and exams. Pooling resources, swapping books and guides can really help - especially when topics call for comparison and analysis of subject matter.
  4. Contact past pupils/colleagues. Try and chat to those who have taken the same tests in previous years, many times they can offer invaluable advice as to how best to go about tackling the work.
  5. Be study wise. Focus on all headings and subheadings. They can help you organize your thoughts – and often give a logical structure to follow. Be sure you know all bold faced or italicized words. (Often, this is a clue that these terms are vital doorways to the information!) Review all summary sections and review questions. This can help to be sure you have successfully hit on all the points the textbook editors feel important. Review highlighted material. You obviously marked the book for a reason, try to figure out why. Be wary of using highlighted lines from second hand textbooks - you don't know for sure that the previous owner of the book got an "A" in the course! Check all your marginal notes. They may help you relate the text to your notes. It is always good to review your thoughts to recapture the moment. Review the key concepts out loud. Being your own lecturer can prove to your benefit, and you get to hear yourself talk! Some students find it extremely beneficial to record themselves reading summaries and notes out loud and then to listen to the notes at the same time as reading them – or just before going to bed. This helps to assimilate the knowledge visually (via the eyes) as well as on the auditory level (via the ears) – thus providing double benefit. 
  6. Natural study aids: if you have difficulty concentrating and remembering what you study, try Study Plus to assist the brain in processing information and recalling studied material. More information can be found here. If you are in the mature years and struggling with memory all round, try Memorise. or natural adult ADHD management, see Focus ADDult.

An Important Message on pharmaceutical ‘Study Aids’


Many parents succumb to fears that their children won’t be able to study unless they are ‘helped’ along with pharmaceutical study aids and tonics which claim to keep students awake and alert while studying. The frightening fact is that this may do them more harm than good. Many over-the-counter study aids contain stimulant drugs or caffeine, that can not only raise the heart rate, cause dizziness and sweating, but can also disturb equilibrium in the brain, and lead to disrupted sleep patterns and other physical side effects. Similarly, over-the-counter sleeping aids, and relaxants can also disturb the body’s balance, and lead to lethargy on the day of the test, and a groggy fogged mind!
So go natural!

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